Careers end with an envelope and expired pass as Deutsche Bank swings

first_img ← Previous Next → Men carry bags and suit carriers as they leave the offices of Deutsche Bank AG in London, U.K., on Monday.Jason Alden/Bloomberg Reddit Sumeet Chatterjee and Navdeep Yadav and Matt Scuffham More Hundreds of staff were informed during the meetings that their positions were being cut, sources within the bank told Reuters. They also received details of their redundancy packages. One source said staff could be seen saying their goodbyes to colleagues upon leaving the cafeteria.Speaking outside the bank’s office, one employee told Reuters the cuts had been anticipated for weeks.“People have been planning their next moves but it’s a tough market,” the person said, speaking on condition of anonymity.Another employee, who asked not to be named, said the bank held a short meeting in its auditorium at 9.30 a.m. EST to inform staff of the cutbacks. He said he was later handed an envelope informing him of his redundancy. The staffer said he and his colleagues had known the impending cuts were likely for the past couple of weeks.Deutsche Bank plans to close all of its equity trading business and cut some parts of its fixed income operations, in an overhaul expected to lead to 18,000 job cuts.Some of those roles will be cut immediately, while some staff will be kept on for longer while they help wind down operations.A few hours after the Hong Kong staff left, workers were seen leaving Deutsche Bank’s office in the City of London, which along with New York is expected to bear the brunt of the cuts, carrying similar envelopes. Employees were told their passes to the building would stop working at 11 a.m.“I was terminated this morning, there was a very quick meeting and that was it,” said one IT worker, who left while Deutsche Bank chief executive Christian Sewing was inside the building doing a call with the media.Few staff wanted to speak outside the bank’s London office, but trade was picking up at the nearby Balls Brothers pub around lunchtime.“I got laid off, where else would I go,” said a man who had just lost his job in equity sales.Deutsche Bank’s office in the City of London, along with New York, is expected to bear the brunt of the cuts. Careers end with an envelope and expired pass as Deutsche Bank swings the axe on 18,000 jobs ‘They give you this packet and you are out of the building’ Twitter Share this storyCareers end with an envelope and expired pass as Deutsche Bank swings the axe on 18,000 jobs Tumblr Pinterest Google+ LinkedIn Recommended For YouU.S. property trust Vornado challenges Arcadia’s restructuring planHong Kong shares creep higher as market awaits U.S. dataEM assets edge higher ahead of U.S. dataAsia refiners test the waters with exports of IMO 2020-compliant fuelUK PM contender Johnson more radical on Irish Brexit backstop, lawmaker says Reuters “They give you this packet and you are out of the building,” said one equities trader.“The equities market is not that great so I may not find a similar job, but I have to deal with it,” said another.At the bank’s Wall Street office, staff impacted by the cuts were summoned to the cafeteria to learn of their fate. A notice inside the building’s lobby told staff the cafeteria would be closed until 11.30 a.m. EST.A man carrying a box leaves a Deutsche Bank office in London. July 8, 201911:05 AM EDTLast UpdatedJuly 9, 20191:43 PM EDT Filed under News FP Street HONG KONG/LONDON/NEW YORK — Summoned by HR to be handed a Deutsche Bank envelope, many of its staff across the world then left their desks for the last time on Monday, shown the door by their German employer within hours of a restructuring announcement.Deutsche Bank confirmed on Sunday that it was closing huge parts of its trading businesses, with staff in its equities division in Sydney and Hong Kong among the first to be told their roles would go. The bank plans on cutting 18,000 staff, a fifth of its workforce.“If you have a job for me, please let me know,” said a banker leaving the Hong Kong office on Monday.Staff leaving in Hong Kong were holding envelopes with the bank’s logo. Three employees took a picture of themselves beside a Deutsche Bank sign outside, hugged and then hailed a taxi.The equities market is not that great so I may not find a similar job center_img Email Reuters/Simon Dawson Far-Flung CutsThe layoffs were going beyond the major financial centers.A Deutsche Bank employee in Bengaluru told Reuters that he and several colleagues were told first thing that their jobs were going.“We were informed that our jobs have become redundant and handed over our letters and given approximately a month’s salary,” he said.“The mood is pretty hopeless right now, especially (among)people who are single-earners or have big financial burdens such as loans to pay,” he added.Deutsche spokespeople in Hong Kong and London declined to comment on specific details about the number of departures, but said they would try to support people being made redundant.For those losing their jobs in equities, finding a new one could prove difficult, with the industry still grappling with higher costs from new European regulations on share trading.“The job market in equities is going to be very tough,” said George Kuznetsov head of research and analytics at Coalition, which analyzes the investment banking industry.“Our expectations is for equities sales and trading revenues falling 7-8% this year and that of course is going to put a lot of halts into the hiring across most of the brokers.”For Deutsche Bank staff whose jobs are safe for now, there was some relief, but also big doubts about the future.“The biggest question for us is where do we go from here if we don’t offer the whole suite of products? Will clients stick with us or is the game over?” said a Singapore banker who remains in his job.© Thomson Reuters 2019 Join the conversation → Comment Facebook 3 Comments advertisement Jason Alden/Bloomberg What you need to know about passing the family cottage to the next generation Sponsored By: Featured Storieslast_img read more

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Tesla Releases Q3 Vehicle Safety Report Autopilot Reduces Crash Risk

Autopilot lessens the likelihood of a crash.At Tesla, safety is paramount. As such, the automaker routinely releases safety-related reports (typically on crash-test results). But moving forward, the automaker now says it will release a quarterly safety report.More Tesla Safety News Watch These NHTSA Tesla Model 3 Crash Test Videos Source: Electric Vehicle News Tesla Model 3 Initial Crash Test Results Released By IIHS Musk Claims Tesla Model 3 Has Best Safety Of Any Midsize Car The vast majority of this first such report focuses on Autopilot. Here are some highlights:Here’s a look at the data we’re able to report for Q3:Over the past quarter, we’ve registered one accident or crash-like event for every 3.34 million miles driven in which drivers had Autopilot engaged.For those driving without Autopilot, we registered one accident or crash-like event for every 1.92 million miles driven. By comparison, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s (NHTSA) most recent data shows that in the United States, there is an automobile crash every 492,000 miles. While NHTSA’s data includes accidents that have occurred, our records include accidents as well as near misses (what we are calling crash-like events).Check out the full report in its entirety below:Q3 2018 Vehicle Safety Report The Tesla Team October 4, 2018 Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on October 4, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News At Tesla, the safety of our customers is our top priority, which is why it’s critical that we design and build the safest cars in the world. Not only do we conduct extensive in-house testing and simulation to ensure our vehicles achieve top safety performance before they ever reach the road, we are also uniquely positioned to leverage the hundreds of thousands of miles of real-world data our fleet collects every month to continuously improve our vehicles and develop a more complete picture of safety over time.Because every Tesla is connected, in most instances we are able to learn immediately when a Tesla vehicle has been involved in a crash. Additionally, our non-traditional sales model allows us to have a direct relationship with our customers for the lifecycle of ownership, providing an avenue for us to supplement our records and gain even more insight as needed. In contrast, automakers whose cars aren’t connected and who utilize networks of third-party franchised dealers may never know when a vehicle is involved in an accident. Through traditional channels, it can take months or even years for lawsuits or claims to be filed that provide automakers with insight into an accident that allows them to draw meaningful conclusions and improve safety.Earlier this year, when we made the decision to begin publishing our safety data on a regular basis, we designed and introduced a completely new telemetry stream for our vehicles to facilitate these reports. This new data stream allows us to gather the most critical fleet-wide statistics from the exact moment a crash-related event is detected by our system. While there are still some unique cases in which crash data may not be available to us through this channel, we believe this system currently provides the best framework for safety reporting on an ongoing basis.Here’s a look at the data we’re able to report for Q3:Over the past quarter, we’ve registered one accident or crash-like event for every 3.34 million miles driven in which drivers had Autopilot engaged.For those driving without Autopilot, we registered one accident or crash-like event for every 1.92 million miles driven. By comparison, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s (NHTSA) most recent data shows that in the United States, there is an automobile crash every 492,000 miles. While NHTSA’s data includes accidents that have occurred, our records include accidents as well as near misses (what we are calling crash-like events).Moving forward, we will publicly release these accident figures on a quarterly basis.Given the degree to which accidents can vary in severity and circumstance, we’ve started an additional initiative to create a more complete picture of safety by gathering serious injury data from our customers following an accident. While we have long maintained the practice of calling our customers whenever our system detects a crash in order to see whether they need emergency assistance, we now also use these calls to understand if they sustained an injury in the crash, and if they have feedback on our current safety system. This will help us continue to improve our system and understand the rate of serious injuries over time.We also encourage our customers to proactively contact Tesla Support if they are ever seriously injured in a Tesla vehicle, or if they have suggestions about improving safety features.As we are working hard to make our cars the safest and most capable cars on the road in terms of passive safety, active safety, and automated driving, we must continue to encourage driver vigilance on the road – that is, by and large, the best way to prevent traffic accidents. Safety is at the core of everything we do and every decision we make, so we cannot stress this enough. We want our cars to not only lead the way to sustainable energy, but also make driving as safe as possible for everyone, and we are working as quickly as we can to achieve that. We look forward to sharing continued updates with our customers and community, and working together to make our vehicles as safe as possible. read more

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The Longest Range Electric Cars For 2019

first_img Here’s What You Need To Charge Your Electric Car At Home Source: Electric Vehicle News 8. NISSAN LEAF E +: 226 MILESThe Nissan Leaf e+ is the long-awaited longer-range version of the long-running Leaf that boosts its operating range from 150 miles in the base versions up to a competitive 226 miles on a charge. New for 2019, it’s expected to reach showrooms this spring. Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on January 26, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News Which Electric Cars Offer The Best Warranties? Tesla Model 3: 2nd Best Resale Among All Cars, Tops Segment & All Classescenter_img Americans drive an average of 40 miles a day, according to the U.S. Department of Transportation, which makes even the shortest-range EV practical (for 2019 that would be the Smart EQ ForTwo at just 58 miles). Still, it’s always better to err on the side of caution and choose an EV that can go the longest distance you can afford. It’s no fun to have to drive with one eye on the road and another on the car’s state-of-charge meter.Fortunately, battery technology is developing rapidly, and automakers are pushing the proverbial envelope in terms of operating range. For the 2019 model year there are no fewer than eight models that can run for more than 200 miles before needing to be tethered to the grid. New longer-range models this year include the Audi e-tron at 248 miles, the Nissan Leaf e+ variant at 226 miles, and the Hyundai Kona Electric that can run for an average 258 miles and is priced under $30,000 after deducting the one-time $7,500 federal tax credit.Your Mileage May VaryOfficial range estimates, along with equivalent “fuel economy” ratings (this is expressed in terms of “MPG-e”) for all EVs sold in the U.S. past and present are posted on the Environmental Protection Agency’s fueleconomy.gov website. We’re featuring the eight EVs with the longest average operating ranges for 2019 in the accompanying slideshow.The outlook is even rosier for 2020 and beyond with new EVs on tap that can traverse as much as 300-400 miles on a charge. Tesla says its revived Roadster, planned for the 2020 model year, will be able to run for as much as 620 miles with a full supply of kilowatts and reach 60 mph in an immediate 1.9 seconds.But one caveat with regard to any electric vehicle’s estimated operating range is to keep in mind that range estimates are averages that are based on an instrumented laboratory analysis conducted under strictly controlled conditions. A given motorist’s real-world range can be wildly different depending on a variety of circumstances.For example, carrying heavier loads, driving at higher speeds, and riding on under-inflated tires will tend to drain the power cells at an accelerate rate. Driving at highway speeds with the windows or a sunroof open will increase an EV’s wind resistance and, in turn, adversely affect its range. Likewise, it takes additional battery power to traverse steep terrain than to drive on flat roads or downhill grades.Also, an electric car tends to run for fewer miles on a charge when it’s subjected to extremely cold or hot weather. This is both because of the adverse effects of high and low temperatures on a battery’s charge, and the load caused by operating the heater and air conditioning.Let’s take a look at these high range electric cars. Source: MYEV.com 7. JAGUAR I-PACE: 234 MILESThe iPace is Jaguar’s first electrified vehicle. It’s a quick and nimble midsize SUV and can run for an estimated 234 miles on a charge. With the equivalent of 395 horsepower, the iPace can sprint to 60 mph in 4.5 seconds.6. CHEVROLET BOLT EV: 238 MILESWith the impending demise of the plug-in Volt, the Chevrolet Bolt EV will continue as the brand’s only electrified ride. It still delivers the goods with a 238-mile range on a charge, but the automaker’s federal tax credits will begin to phase out this spring.Audi e-tron5. AUDI E-TRON: 248 MILESThis spring Audi will debut a new full electric all-wheel-drive five-passenger luxury crossover SUV with an expected range of 248 miles. It won’t be cheap, but it should be posh and powerful.4. HYUNDAI KONA ELECTRIC: 258 MILESNew for 2019, this electrified compact crossover SUV is estimated to run for 258 miles before needing to be plugged in, and it costs under $30,000 when the one-time federal tax credit is applied.Tesla Model X with Chinese GB/T DC charging inlet3. TESLA MODEL X: 295 MILESSales of the large Tesla Model X are booming, thanks to the sudden shift in consumer preference away from sedans and into sport-utility vehicles. This gull-wing-door-equipped SUV is rated to run for 295 miles on a charge with the 100D version and 289 miles with the P100D. As with the other Teslas on this list the Model X’s federal tax credit is phasing out this year.2. TESLA MODEL 3: 310 MILESThe compact Tesla Model 3 sedan is a hot seller despite never being released in its fabled base $35,000 version. The appropriately named Long Range model is the line’s leader with an average 310 miles on a charge. It gets bumped down to 260 with the more-affordable Mid-Range model.Tesla Model S1. TESLA MODEL S: 335 MILESOne or more new EVs may surpass the still-futuristic-looking Tesla Model S sedan’s range next year, for the time being it stands as the industry’s longest-range runner, with a maximum of 335 miles in its 100D version. It’s at 315 miles with the 100D Performance variant. No fewer than 8 models available with over 200 miles or range.Aside from perhaps its sticker price, an electric vehicle’s most critical specification is the distance it can travel on a charge. Buying an EV that delivers a sufficient operating range to meet one’s needs can mean the difference between happily driving a zero-emissions vehicle that never has to visit a gas station, and becoming stranded at the side of the road with a depleted battery.More EV Buying Infolast_img read more

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Pompey handle Baggies challenge but do little to quicken the pulse

first_imgShare on Pinterest Pompey handle Baggies’ challenge but do little to quicken the pulse Share on Twitter Soccer Soccer match reports Shares00 Share via Email Topics Perhaps Portsmouth are saving their best till last. Having won a place in the FA Cup semi-finals through doughty defending at Old Trafford, backed by a penalty and a bit of luck, they reached their first final for 69 years after a largely turgid performance and a bit more luck, since the winning goal should have been disallowed for handball.That said, the return of Harry Redknapp’s team to Wembley on May 17 will bring some much-needed novelty to an occasion dominated for the past 17 years by Manchester United, Liverpool, Arsenal and Chelsea. For thirtysomethings such as Sol Campbell and Nwankwo Kanu, both of whom helped Arsenal win the FA Cup in Cardiff, there will be an opportunity to collect winners’ medals at Wembley, and David James, 37, whose goalkeeping this season has been sufficiently inspired to regain him his England place, will get a chance to add an honour to a career which has been more colossal than calamitous.West Bromwich Albion, the most prolific team in the four divisions, came to Wembley on Saturday having scored 99 times in all competitions this season but lost, paradoxically, because they did not start shooting until they had fallen behind despite dominating the first half with their precise passing. At least they can now concentrate on regaining the Premier League place they lost two seasons ago. As it is, reaching the last four has seen them taking an eye off the ball in the Championship so that where they once appeared to be heading for automatic promotion they are now hanging on for a place in the play-offs.Not that Tony Mowbray and his team would return to Wembley for a play-off final with an extra spring in their step. Saturday’s defeat followed the pattern of the way Albion lost last season’s deciding play-off against Derby County when they were beaten by a solitary goal after having had most of the play.Mowbray felt Saturday’s display proved his team’s ability to compete in the higher division. “In the Championship, teams do not allow you the space Portsmouth did here,” he said. “That was not a rise-to-the-occasion performance you saw today. We’ve been doing this week by week.”Mowbray may be right. If West Bromwich do go up they may, like Reading or Ipswich, surprise opponents with the quality of their passing and movement, not to mention their finishing. Nevertheless it was noticeable on Saturday that free scorers such as the Czech international Roman Bednar and his replacement, Ishmael Miller, made little impression on the first Premier League defence they had encountered in this season’s FA Cup, and that the experienced Kevin Phillips, for all his subtle touches, enjoyed few glimpses of goal past Campbell and Sylvain Distin.Not that Portsmouth looked any more like scoring before they went ahead nine minutes into the second half. “Play up Pompey, Pompey play up,” sang their supporters dutifully but for most of the first half Redknapp’s side failed to move with the chimes.Not only does Redknapp share the matey style of Terry Venables, he has a similar knack of spotting when something is not right and making the necessary adjustments. “In the first half they were passing the ball better than us,” he explained, “and we had problems getting close to anybody. It was difficult making contact with them. So we changed things at half-time. We pushed Kanu up and brought in Niko Kranjcar and Papa Diop from the flanks to play a bit narrower.”Certainly Jonathan Greening and Robert Koren found the space they had exploited so well in the first half more elusive in the second and when Albion did threaten to bring the scores level late in the match the danger to Portsmouth came more from Carl Hoefkens and Paul Robinson advancing from full-back. By that time the contest should have been put beyond West Brom’s reach, Milan Baros and David Nugent, who replaced him, fluffing opportunities set up by Kranjcar’s perceptive passes.At first sight Portsmouth’s winner appeared to be down to a slick piece of work by Baros, who chested down a ball from Glen Johnson on the right, turning past Martin Albrechtsen as he did so. Dean Kiely managed to push away the Czech striker’s shot but the goalkeeper’s attempt to gather the ball was impeded by Zoltan Gera’s lunge back to clear it. Amid the confusion Kanu, restored to the Portsmouth attack because Jermain Defoe was cup-tied, tapped the ball into the net.Television replays showed that Baros, in taking the ball on his chest, had controlled it with an arm. In the immediate and bitter aftermath of losing a semi-final Phillips accused the referee, Howard Webb, of a dereliction of duty. “You know what these officials are like,” he said. “They tend to bottle it a little bit in big games.” The truth surely was that Webb had not seen the incident. It happens.Astute low crosses from Hoefkens led to Koren glancing a shot off the Portsmouth crossbar with James looking beaten and Miller putting Albion’s best chance of the game wide. After that Baggies became saggies but at least Mowbray’s team had done enough to give the winners of the other semi-final more than a glimmer of hope.Portsmouth, underdogs when they first won the FA Cup by beating Wolves in 1939, are hot favourites now. Not that they will hold the trophy for quite so long if they do win it – unless of course Germany decides to invade Poland again this September.Man of the match Niko Kranjcarwhose vision and passing brought life to a previously lifeless attack after half-time.Best moment Kranjcar’s cleverly angled through-ball to Milan Baros just past the hour which the Czech striker should have turned into a second goal for Portsmouth FA Cup Share on Facebook Portsmouth David Lacey at Wembley Stadium Share via Email First published on Sun 6 Apr 2008 19.35 EDT West Bromwich Albion Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Messenger Share on LinkedIn FA Cup 2007-08 Share on WhatsApp Sun 6 Apr 2008 19.35 EDT Reuse this contentlast_img read more

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Evidence lost before McKeown hearing

first_imgShares00 Share on Twitter Since you’re here… This article is more than 10 years old Horse racing Thu 9 Oct 2008 19.01 EDT @claimsfive Topics Share on LinkedIn • Ruling body failed to preserve footage of races• Jockey’s career in balance as verdict awaited Share on WhatsApp news Evidence lost before McKeown hearing Read more Share on Messenger The Recap: sign up for the best of the Guardian’s sport coverage For seven of the eight races involving McKeown, the only footage that remains is the film that was broadcast as the race was in progress. A Racetech spokesman confirmed yesterday: “We keep every view for two years and then the tapes would be recycled.”BHA representatives admitted during the hearing, which was closed to the press and public, that no request was made for the footage until July 2007, by which time almost all of the relevant tapes had been wiped. No explanation was offered for the lateness of this request. It is understood that the BHA’s investigation has been in progress since 2004. Three of McKeown’s rides involved in the case resulted in stewards’ inquiries on the day. In no case did the stewards find McKeown guilty of any wrongdoing, having viewed a complete set of films.But last week’s hearing was told that the transcripts of those inquiries have also been lost. The BHA’s disciplinary panel is now considering whether to find McKeown guilty on the basis of considerably less evidence than was available to the raceday stewards years before.A spokesman for the BHA said no comment would be offered on the case or any matter relating to it until the disciplinary panel issued its decision. He added that no verdict was expected until next week at the earliest. All nine defendants deny the charges.The case was the first to be announced by the BHA after the collapse of last year’s race-fixing trial at the Old Bailey involving Kieren Fallon, which was widely seen as a humiliating blow to the BHA’s security department and its head, Paul Scotney. When charges were issued in May, Scotney admitted his regret that this case had taken so long, but blamed a lack of co-operation from the accused individuals. Later that month, an independent review recommended that the BHA find ways to speed up the prosecution of cases.center_img First published on Thu 9 Oct 2008 19.01 EDT Share via Email … we have a small favour to ask. The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Crucial evidence was unavailable to last week’s corruption inquiry involving the trainer Paul Blockley and the jockey Dean McKeown, it emerged yesterday. Video footage of most of the races concerned, as well as transcripts of stewards’ inquiries, had been destroyed because the British Horseracing Authority did not move quickly enough to preserve them.Blockley, McKeown and seven others were charged with corruption offences in relation to 11 races that took place between March 2004 and December 2005. McKeown, who rode in eight of the races, is also charged with not trying on the horses concerned and the 48-year-old faces a career-ending ban if found guilty.But the case will be decided on the basis of incomplete evidence. Footage of the races was recorded and stored by Racetech, a subsidiary of the Racecourse Association, but much of it was destroyed after two years, in line with company policy. Film shot from positions side-on to the track, head-on and from the bottom of the straight has been lost. Share via Email Dean McKeown Support The Guardian Share on Twitter Chris Cook This article is more than 10 years old Horse racing Share on Pinterest Share on Facebook Share on Facebook Reuse this contentlast_img read more

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Snow on the way with Winter Weather AdvisoryGeneral Election NCW ResultsGrant County

first_imgThe National Weather Service in Spokane has issued a Winter Weather Advisory.  A Pacific storm system will spread snow across much of the region  tonight and Thursday.The Wenatchee Area, Okanogan Valley and Waterville Plateau are included in the advisory in effect from 4pm Wednesday through 4pm Thursday.Snow will dominate in the valleys with total snow accumulations of 1 to 3 inches. Snow and local freezing rain is likely on the Waterville Plateau with ice accumulations of around one tenth possible along with 2 to 4 inches of snow.Snow will begin late this afternoon near Wenatchee and on the Waterville Plateau and spread north into the Okanogan Valley this evening. Freezing rain will be possible late tonight and Thursday morning.Expect slippery travel conditions for the Thursday morning commute period.last_img read more

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What PersonCentered Care Means to Me

first_imgby, Martha Stettinius, ChangingAging ContributorTweet1Share4ShareEmail5 Shares“Person-centered care” is the buzzword of the moment in elder care. Nearly every home health care agency or senior care facility will tell you that they offer person-centered care. But what does that mean?For eight years I was the main caregiver for my mother, Judy, in my home, in assisted living, a rehab center, a “memory care” facility, and a nursing home. She had vascular dementia and probable Alzheimer’s disease, and as she needed more assistance, I learned what makes person-centered care special, and how it could help me feel closer to her.When my husband and I invited my mother to move in with us and our young children in 2005, I knew nothing about person-centered care. Like many “sandwich generation” parents who find themselves suddenly taking on the role of caregiver for an aging parent, I was used to thinking primarily of myself and my children. When she moved in I paid little attention to what my mother might be feeling as she lost so much all at once—her memory, home, car, independence, and confidence. For several years I would think of caregiving simply as a series of tasks, and my time with my mother as duty, not pleasure.I was fortunate to live next door to a woman who leads workshops on person-centered care for an international organization (The Eden Alternative®). I also attended gerontology conferences where experts spoke about person-centered care, and I read many books on the subject. Then, after Mom moved into assisted living, I tried to practice what I learned.To me, person-centered care means that we take time to connect with the person as a unique individual. Even if a person cannot speak, as in late dementia, they often express those feelings and needs in other ways—through their eyes, their facial expression, and their body language. When talking to Mom, I found that if I paid close enough attention, I would almost always see a reaction—a raised eyebrow, a twinkle in her eye, a furrowed brow, a puff of a laugh through her nose like a tiny set of bellows.To me, person-centered care means slowing down enough to just “be” with the person for a few minutes—to look beyond the endless to-do list of caregiving and enjoy the person. Person-centered care also builds on the person’s strengths and what they enjoy. Through the final stages of dementia, Mom seemed happiest outdoors or listening to music.Unfortunately, with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias, a stigma remains that people with dementia are not fully “here,” that they are no longer themselves. Caregivers often treat them accordingly—as a diagnosis, not a person. A simple example is when I accompanied my mother to a rehab center after she fell in assisted living and fractured her pelvis. On Mom’s first day in rehab, when the physical therapist pushed Mom to walk a long distance in order to evaluate Mom’s pain threshold, Mom cursed at her and refused to walk farther. The physical therapist blamed Mom’s behavior on dementia. “We’re used to seeing that kind of resistance,” she told me. I later told the therapist that Mom was swearing at her and refusing to walk farther not because of dementia but because Mom was in severe pain.If your loved one needs a rehab center or other care facility, how do you find one that is truly person-centered? I suggest visiting, watching and asking questions. Do the staff offer hugs, hold the residents’ hands, offer to dance with them, look them in the eye and talk to them? Or is it all business, with residents left alone for hours with no human interaction? When an aide carries a dinner tray to a resident, do they plop it down with no comment or do they take a moment to smile, make eye contact and say hello, using the resident’s name? When the aides feed those who must be spoon-fed, do they talk only amongst themselves, or do they, again, make eye contact with the residents they are feeding and talk to them? Do the director, nurses, social workers and activities directors model person-centered care? Three examples of truly person-centered care are nursing homes that are part of The Eden Alternative registry; the Green House Project®; and the Lakeview Ranch model.Care at home can also be “person-centered,” or not. When a caregiver at home lacks enough support, caregiving can easily fall into a replication of the kind of care found in a typical institution: care that is task- and schedule-oriented instead of person-centered, with interactions that exhaust, frustrate, and deplete everyone involved. To learn more about person-centered care in the home (and “person-directed” care, an extension of person-centered care), visit Eden at Home®, a recent initiative of The Eden Alternative.Related PostsBook Review: Aging Together – Dementia, Friendship and Flourishing CommunitiesBooks on dementia are usually addressed not to friends but to family caregivers or professionals. I approached this book with excitement because we rarely see the words “dementia,” “friendship” and “communities” together.Advances in Person-Centered Dementia CareIn 2001, the Institute on Medicine released a seminal report titled “Crossing the Quality Chasm” that described healthcare in America as impersonal and fragmented.Thinking About Person-Centered CareA couple of weeks ago I published an article titled “Bill Thomas Says I Am an Abolitionist”.Tweet1Share4ShareEmail5 SharesTags: Alzheimers Assisted Living Dementia home care Innovation nursing home person-centeredlast_img read more

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RIKEN to Check 20000 Papers for Doctored Images and Plagiarism

RIKEN TOKYO—Shock waves emanating from allegations of image manipulation and plagiarism in two Nature papers published in January continue to ripple through RIKEN, the Japanese institute at the center of the ongoing controversy. Last week, local media reported (in Japanese) that questions have arisen about images in research papers published by three more members of a RIKEN committee charged with investigating the Nature papers. The news came a week after RIKEN announced it would investigate allegations of image manipulation in papers published by Shunsuke Ishii, who resigned as chair of the investigating committee on 25 April.Now, the Yomiuri Shimbun newspaper is reporting that RIKEN President Ryoji Noyori has asked all laboratory and research group leaders to check all of their previous publications for doctored images and plagiarism. The newspaper quotes an unnamed RIKEN official as saying the directive covers at least 20,000 publications. There was no indication of a deadline for completing the reviews.The still-unfolding controversy stems from instances of image manipulation and plagiarism in an article and a letter published online on 29 January in Nature by Haruko Obokata of RIKEN’s Center for Developmental Biology in Kobe, together with colleagues at RIKEN and other institutions in Japan and at Harvard Medical School in Boston. The researchers reported finding a new, simple way of creating stem cells, called stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency, which so far no other groups have been able to reproduce. The investigating committee, while still headed by Ishii, found numerous problems with the papers and concluded that two instances constituted research misconduct. Obokata is appealing the finding, claiming the problems resulted from innocent mistakes. RIKEN officials could not be reached for comment today because of a national holiday in Japan. read more

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Top Nobel Prize administrator resigns in wake of Macchiarini scandal

first_imgThe widening scandal surrounding surgeon Paolo Macchiarini and his employment at the Karolinska Insitute (KI) in Stockholm has prompted Urban Lendahl, secretary general of the Nobel Assembly, to resign. Lendahl, a developmental geneticist at KI, was involved in hiring Macchiarini in 2010, according to Swedish media reports. A statement from the Nobel Committee today said that Lendahl expected to be involved in the investigation and was giving up his work on the committee “out of respect for the integrity of the Nobel Prize work.”KI announced last week that it had “lost confidence” in Macchiarini  and would cut ties with him when his current contract as a senior researcher ends in November. It also said it would launch an external investigation into the university’s interactions with Maccharini since his hiring as a guest professor in 2010.Lendahl has been a member of the Nobel Assembly at KI since 2000. Made up of 50 professors from KI, the assembly chooses the winner of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine every year. Lendahl was elected as secretary general in late 2014 and assumed office in early 2015. The secretary general directs the Nobel office at KI, is the assembly’s spokesperson, and usually announces the winner of the prize—as Lendahl did last October, when the Nobel went to three pioneers in antiparasitic drug development. The job “clearly involves a fair share of administrative work,” Lendahl said in an interview last year, “but the most exciting part is to be constantly engaged in thinking about and discussing the best science that is conducted on the planet.” Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Lendahl’s resignation is an indirect result of The Experiments, a documentary that aired in January on Swedish public television station SVT and that led to KI’s decision to cut ties with Macchiarini. The film detailed the troubling questions about Macchiarini’s pioneering trachea implants—six of eight patients who received his polymer windpipes have died—and the way he described his operations as a success in scientific papers. The documentary also cast doubt on KI’s investigation into Macchiarini’s work. It suggested that four KI doctors who acted as whistleblowers in Macchiarini’s case in 2014 had trouble getting the university to take their concerns seriously and questioned why KI Vice-Chancellor Anders Hamsten cleared Macchiarini of misconduct charges even though an external investigator commissioned by the university found him guilty.In a letter the four doctors wrote to Hamsten and other KI administrators on 1 February, they provided more details about their past difficulties. They also sought to dispel the notion that, until The Experiments was released, KI leaders were not aware of the extent of the problems with Macchiarini’s work. The four say that KI has embarked on a “diversion tactic” whose purpose is “to provide KI, under the leadership of Prof Hamsten, with an air of plausible deniability to the images revealed in the documentary.”“[Vice-Chancellor] Prof Hamsten was informed personally in detail on Feb 21, 2014 by Dr. Grinnemo of the state of the patients operated on at Karolinska and the gross and serial misrepresentation of their clinical outcome in the articles published by Prof Macchiarini,” the letter states. “At this time KI should have immediately initiated an investigation but instead did nothing. After this first meeting at least 9 attempts on our part were initiated to bring attention to these circumstances and implement a moratorium and an investigation to prevent further patients from being put in what seemed to be life-threatening danger.”KI did not launch an investigation until November 2014, after The New York Times reported on the complaints. Another patient received an artificial trachea in the summer of 2014. According to The Experiments, he was able to have it removed after it failed, and he is still alive.center_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Emaillast_img read more

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One of the most powerful science policy jobs in Brussels changes hands

first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) By Tania RabesandratanaFeb. 23, 2018 , 1:00 PM Robert-Jan Smits at a Horizon 2020 launch event in Rome in 2014. Desiging and negotiating the €80 billion program is his “biggest pride,” Smits says. One of the most powerful science policy jobs in Brussels changes hands Emailcenter_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe It’s the end of an era at the European Commission’s research department: The most powerful civil servant in Brussels’s science policy circles, Director-General for Research and Innovation Robert-Jan Smits, is leaving his post. Smits has been named an adviser at the European Political Strategy Centre, the commission’s in-house think tank (where his exact mission is “still to be determined”); he will be succeeded by France’s Jean-Eric Paquet, now deputy secretary-general of the commission, on 1 April.Smits will be remembered as an advocate for larger science budgets and as one of the architects of Horizon 2020—the European Union’s 7-year, €80 billion funding program for research and innovation, which started in 2014. He was also a staunch supporter of the European Research Council (ERC), the European Union’s beloved funding agency for basic research, which started giving out grants in 2007 and had a €1.8 billion budget last year. Smits has both a genuine interest in science and a deep knowledge of the commission’s workings, says former ERC President Helga Nowotny. He “knew how to put both at the service of European research and the scientific community,” and “will be missed,” she adds.Directors-general are civil servants who run the departments that carry out EU policies and are less visible than the 28 commissioners—one per member state and per policy area. But Smits, a charismatic, well-liked bureaucrat with a steely handshake and a knack for networking, became an influential player of his own. Luigi Mistrulli/SIPA/AP Images “My biggest pride is having designed and negotiated Horizon 2020, and being able in a period of crisis to raise the budget from €55 billion [in the previous 7-year period] to €80 billion,” Smits tells ScienceInsider. He says he hopes that the next budget—for the period 2021–27—will rise to at least €120 billion, as the European Parliament has requested, even though the European Union will lose the United Kingdom’s contribution when the country leaves the bloc next year.Although directors-general generally stay in their posts for 5 years, Smits’s term stretched to almost 8 years. “It was time to move on,” he says, adding that the draft program for Horizon 2020’s successor, to be released at the beginning of June, is “80% ready.” Paquet will see the program through negotiations with the European Parliament and member states.Smits, who is from the Netherlands, joined the Directorate-General for Research and Innovation (DG research) in 1989 and worked in different research policy roles until taking up the top post in July 2010. “When I started in the ’80s, colleagues [in other commission services] thought that we at DG research were people in white coats doing research ourselves,” he recalls. “Over the years, we have moved research and innovation out of their silo and embedded them in other policy areas.”The portfolio has indeed earned prestige. Research and innovation programs now get the third largest chunk of the European Union’s budget, after agriculture and structural funds for regional development. Smits says his services are regularly brought in to help develop other EU policies—for instance related to the environment, energy, or transport—with science and innovation in mind. “In the old days, [other departments] wouldn’t invite us to the meetings, now they immediately reach out to us.” But Smits says more needs to be done to help bridge the scientific gap between the north and south of the European Union. “Some parts of the union are lagging behind and young people are leaving to other parts of the world,” he says.This will be one of the challenges on his successor’s desk. Paquet joined the commission in 1993 and has worked in several policy areas, including transport, relationships with the western Balkans, and an ambassador stint in Mauritania.He is no stranger to science policy. Between 2002 and 2004, he served as deputy head of cabinet of Research Commissioner Philippe Busquin, from Belgium. Busquin championed the idea of a European Research Area—where countries share research agendas and infrastructure, scientists and ideas move freely, and cross-border projects flourish—but this vision is “still far from being completed … as Brexit, among other challenges, reminds us,” Nowotny says. This experience will certainly come in handy as Paquet’s new job requires working closely with the current Research Commissioner Carlos Moedas, from Portugal.The personnel changes at DG research are part of a wider reshuffle announced on 21 February. Signe Ratso, an Estonian national who has worked in the commission’s trade department for the past 12 years, will become deputy director-general for research. The reshuffle allows commission President Jean-Claude Juncker to make good on his promise to increase the number of women in senior management roles, 20 months before the end of his term. Women now hold 36% of the commission’s directors-general and deputy directors-general positions, up from 11% in November 2014 and close to the target of 40% by 31 October 2019.last_img read more

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Northam Fairfax Have First Joint Appearance In Months

first_img It's Above Me Now Best Western viral video screenshot Everything We Know About Sadie Roberts-Joseph’s Murder Investigation The Evolving Relevance Of ‘The Talk’ Thanks for signing up! Get ready for Exclusive content, Interviews,and Breaking news delivered direct to your inbox. Get ready for Exclusive content, Interviews,and Breaking news delivered direct to your inbox. In wake of Virginia Beach shooting, VA Gov. Northam summons members of state House & Senate for special session to pass a “common sense public safety laws.””I will be asking for votes and laws. Not thoughts and prayers.” https://t.co/jOqQkXpV7C pic.twitter.com/tWXtMjQRXL 1/2 @GovernorVA will propose: universal background checks, ban on assault weapons to include suppressors and bump stocks, extreme ricks protective order, one gun a month law, child access prevention, requiring people to report lost and stolen guns –— Leanna Scachetti (@LeannaScachetti) June 4, 2019 The top two elected officials in Virginia appeared together in public for the first time in more than five months as officials the commonwealth continued to deal with the fallout from Friday’s deadly mass shooting in Virginia Beach. Despite their recent and very public differences, Gov. Ralph Northam and Lt. Gov. Justin Fairfax seemed unified when they announced plans for gun control during a special session of the General Assembly in the capital city of Richmond on Tuesday morning. 2/2 @GovernorVA – and expanding local authority to regulate guns including in government buildings. “I will be asking for votes and laws, not thoughts and prayers.”— Leanna Scachetti (@LeannaScachetti) June 4, 2019Northam and Fairfax have been making the rounds in Virginia Beach in the days after city worker DeWayne Craddock killed at least 12 people during a rampage in a municipal building on Friday afternoon. But Tuesday was the first time responded to the shooting together. — Sarah Jones Reports (@SarahJReports) June 4, 2019“It’s time for decisive action,” Northam said. “Let Virginia show the nation that we can respond to tragedy with decisive action.” In wake of Virginia Beach shooting, VA Gov. Northam summons members of the state House and Senate to have a special session for the purpose of passing a “common sense public safety laws.””I will be asking for votes and laws. Not thoughts and prayers.” https://t.co/3a221SVZ8y pic.twitter.com/hute8Oyg5H— CBS News (@CBSNews) June 4, 2019Despite the gravity of the situation, the appearance of Northam with Fairfax was hard to ignore. The two had reportedly fallen out after it was revealed on the first day of Black History Month that Northam’s medical school yearbook page contained photos of people in blackface. However, a recent report conveniently couldn’t decide whether Northam was actually one of the people in the picture.Fairfax, in turn, was all but ready to assume the governorship when it was widely expected that Northam would resign in shame. Instead, two women ultimately came forward to accuse Fairfax of sexual assault from their respective college days more than a decade ago. One of the women said Fairfax raped her. Fairfax has been steadfast in his denials of the allegations, questioning the timing of them. The women said they came forward because they didn’t want to see a person they described as a sexual predator become governor.center_img Entertainment, News and Lifestyle for Black America. News told by us for us. Black America’s #1 News Source: Our News. Our Voice. Gun Control , Justin Fairfax , Mark Herring , Ralph Northam , Virginia , Virginia Beach shooting More By Bruce C.T. Wright But on Tuesday, it appeared the governor and his lieutenant put aside their differences in the name of gun control, a common refrain in the wake of the repeated senseless gun violence plaguing the country. Only time will tell if this time around will be different.Attorney General Mark Herring, who was also dealing with his own blackface photo controversy, joined Northam and Fairfax. Watch their full comments below.SEE ALSO:‘I Don’t Want Those People In Our Store’: Subway Manager Fired For Racist Texts About Job ApplicantCentral Park Jogger Praised The Racist Prosecutors, ‘They Treated Me With Such Dignity’ SUBSCRIBE Northam on new gun legislation: “This weekend’s tragedy as well as the tragedies that happened every day across Virginia must instill in us a new level of urgency to act. If we can save one life because we act it now, it is worth it.” https://t.co/3a221SVZ8y pic.twitter.com/xAHkO2QQCG— CBS News (@CBSNews) June 4, 2019The Washington Post reported that the “Republican response was cool,” which suggested conservative politicians in the state may not be as eager for tighter gun laws as their Democratic counterparts, an indication that a legislative fight may be looming. ‘It’s Above Me Now’: Hotel Clerk’s Video With Racist Guest Goes Viral Unpacking Mayor Pete’s ‘Douglass Plan’ For Black Americalast_img read more

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Update Japanese spacecraft safely lands and leaves asteroid surface in effort to

first_imgHayabusa2 imaged its shadow during a rehearsal descent. Geologist Stephen Mojzsis of the University of Colorado in Boulder is not convinced such asteroids will prove to be the source of Earth’s water; there are other theories, he says, including the possibility that a giant Jupiter-like gaseous planet migrated from the outer to the inner solar system, bringing water and other molecules with it around the time Earth was formed. Still, findings on Ryugu’s shape and composition “scientifically, could be very important,” he says.Some new details come from up-close looks at the asteroid’s surface. On 21 September, Hayabusa2 dropped a pair of rovers the size of a birthday cake, named Minerva-II1A and -II1B, on Ryugu’s northern hemisphere. Taking advantage of its low gravity to hop autonomously, they take pictures that have revealed “microscopic features of the surface,” Tsuda says. And on 5 October, Hayabusa2 released a rover developed by the German and French space agencies that analyzed soil samples in situ and returned additional pictures.The ultimate objective, to bring asteroid samples back to Earth, will allow lab studies that can reveal much more about the asteroid’s age and content. ISAS engineers programmed the craft to perform autonomous landings, anticipating safe touchdown zones at least 100 meters in diameter. Instead, the biggest safe area within the first landing zone turned out to be just 12 meters wide.That will complicate what was already a nail-biting operation. Prior to each landing, Hayabusa2 planned to drop a small sphere sheathed in a highly reflective material to be used as a target, to ensure the craft is moving in sync with the asteroid’s rotation. Gravity then pulls the craft down gently until a collection horn extending from its underside makes contact with the asteroid; after a bulletlike projectile is fired into the surface, soil and rock fragments hopefully ricochet into a catcher within the horn. For safety, the craft has to steer clear of rocks larger than 70 centimeters.During a rehearsal in late October, Hayabusa2 released a target marker above the 12-meter safe circle; unfortunately, it came to rest more than 10 meters outside the zone. But it is just 2.9 meters away from the edge of a second possible landing site that’s 6 meters in diameter. Engineers now plan to have the craft first hover above the target marker and then move laterally to be above the center of one of the two sites. Because the navigation camera points straight down, the target marker will be outside the camera’s field of view as Hayabusa2 descends, leaving the craft to navigate on its own.”We are now in the process of selecting which landing site” to aim for, says Fuyuto Terui, who is in charge of mission guidance, navigation, and control. Aiming at the smaller zone means Hayabusa2 can keep the target marker in sight until the craft is close to the surface; the bigger zone gives more leeway for error, but the craft will lose its view of the marker earlier in the descent.Assuming the craft survives the first landing, plans call for Hayabusa2 to blast a 2-meter-deep crater into Ryugu’s surface at another site a few months later, by hitting it with a 2-kilogram, copper projectile. This is expected to expose subsurface material for observations by the craft’s cameras and sensors; the spacecraft may collect some material from the crater as well, using the same horn device. There could be a third touchdown, elsewhere on the asteroid. If all goes well, Hayabusa2 will make it back to Earth with its treasures in 2020. A close-up from Hayabusa2 shows a surface strewn with boulders. By Dennis NormileFeb. 22, 2019 , 6:30 AM But the target asteroid, Ryugu, had fresh surprises in store. “By looking at the details of every asteroid ever studied, we had expected to find at least some wide flat area suitable for a landing,” says Yuichi Tsuda, Hayabusa2’s project manager at the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency’s Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), which is headquartered in Sagamihara. Instead, when the spacecraft reached Ryugu in June 2018—at 290 million kilometers from Earth—it found a cragged, cratered, boulder-strewn surface that makes landing a daunting challenge. The first sampling touchdown, scheduled for October, was postponed until at least the end of this month, and at a symposium here on 21 and 22 December, ISAS engineers presented an audacious new plan to make a pinpoint landing between closely spaced boulders. “It’s breathtaking,” says Bruce Damer, an origins of life researcher at the University of California, Santa Cruz.Yet most everything else has gone according to plan since Hayabusa2 was launched in December 2014. Its cameras and detectors have already provided clues to the asteroid’s mass, density, and mineral and elemental composition, and three rovers dropped on the asteroid have examined the surface. At the symposium, ISAS researchers presented early results, including evidence of an abundance of organic material and hints that the asteroid’s parent body once held water. Those findings “add to the evidence that asteroids rather than comets brought water and organic materials to Earth,” says project scientist Seiichiro Watanabe of Nagoya University in Japan.Ryugu is 1 kilometer across and 900 meters top to bottom, with a notable bulge around the equator, like a diamond. Visible light observations and computer modeling suggest it’s a porous pile of rubble that likely agglomerated dust, rocks, and boulders after another asteroid or planetesimal slammed into its parent body during the early days of the solar system. Ryugu spins around its own axis once every 7.6 hours, but simulations suggest that during the early phase of its formation, it had a rotation period of only 3.5 hours. That probably produced the bulge, by causing surface landslides or pushing material outward from the core, Watanabe says. Analyzing surface material from the equator in an Earth-based laboratory could offer support for one of those scenarios, he adds. If the sample has been exposed to space weathering for a long time, it was likely moved there by landslides; if it is relatively fresh, it probably migrated from the asteroid’s interior.So far, Hayabusa2 has not detected water on or near Ryugu’s surface. But its infrared spectrometer has found signs of hydroxide-bearing minerals that suggest water once existed either on the parent body or on the asteroid, says Mutsumi Komatsu, a planetary materials scientist at the Graduate University for Advanced Studies in Hayama, Japan. The asteroid’s high porosity also suggests it once harbored significant amounts of water or ice and other volatile compounds that later escaped, Watanabe says. Asteroids such as Ryugu are rich in carbon as well, and they may have been responsible for bringing both water and carbon, life’s key building block, to a rocky Earth early in its history. (Comets, by contrast, are just 3% to 5% carbon.)Support for that theory, known as the late heavy bombardment, comes from another asteroid sample return mission now in progress. Early last month, NASA’s OSIRISREx reached asteroid Bennu, which is shaped like a spinning top as well and, the U.S. space agency has reported, has water trapped in the soil. “We’re lucky to be able to conduct comparative studies of these two asteroid brothers,” Watanabe says. JAXA *Update, 22 February, 6:33 a.m.: Japan’s Hayabusa2 spacecraft successfully executed a challenging touchdown on asteroid Ryugu today at about 7:30 a.m. Japan time. Officials from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency confirmed that during an autonomous operation Hayabusa2 landed momentarily within a target site just 6 meters wide and fired a steel pellet into the surface of the asteroid in hopes of scattering fragments into a collection horn. Mission planners hoped to collect 10 grams of material, but the amount won’t be known for sure until the sample container is returned to Earth in 2020. Hayabusa2 could make two more touchdowns to gather additional samples. Here is our 4 January story previewing its historic touchdown plans: YONAGO, JAPAN—Japan’s Hayabusa mission made history in 2010 for bringing back to Earth the first samples ever collected on an asteroid. But the 7-year, 4-billion-kilometer odyssey was marked by degraded solar panels, innumerable mechanical failures, and a fuel explosion that knocked the spacecraft into a tumble and cut communications with ground control for 2 months. When planning its encore, Hayabusa2, Japan’s scientists and engineers were determined to avoid such drama. They made components more robust, enhanced communications capabilities, and thoroughly tested new technologies. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Update: Japanese spacecraft safely lands and leaves asteroid surface in effort to collect samples Email JAXA, UNIVERSITY OF TOKYO, KOCHI UNIVERSITY, RIKKYO UNIVERSITY, NAGOYA UNIVERSITY, CHIBA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, MEIJI UNIVERSITY, UNIVERSITY OF AIZU, AIST Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)last_img read more

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4000yrold Lost City Discovered – Gateway to Mesopotamias First Great Empire

first_imgA team of French archaeologists has discovered the remnants of an ancient lost city at Kunara, close to the Zagros mountains, in present-day Iraqi Kurdistan. At the time the city would have stood on a strategically-important position, “at the gates” of the Akkadian Empire, which is ancient Mesopotamia’s first grandiose empire, archaeologists said.According to the French team, the recently found city likely belonged to the mountainous pre-Iranian people known as the Lullubi. Dated to the latter part of the 3rd millennium BC, the so far unnamed city may have even served as the capital of the Lullubi.Territory of the Lullubi in the Mesopotamia area. Photo by Jolle CC BY-SA 4.0In ancient Mesopotamian scriptures, these mysterious people from the mountains are referred to as barbarians. A limestone artifact depicting one of the Akkadian rulers, Naram-Sin, displayed at the Louvre Museum, shows how he cherishes his victory over the Lullubi. Only a few other mentions in literature exist about these people, perhaps until now. According findings, published in the journal of the French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS) on March 19, 2019, six excavation campaigns were carried out on the site of Kunara, between 2012 and 2018.King Anubanini of Lullubi, holding an axe and a bow, trampling a foe. Anubanini rock relief, circa 2300-2000 BC. Sar-I Pul, Iran. Photo by Koorosh Nozad Tehrani CC BY-SA 2.0Stone foundations of considerable size found both in the upper and lower excavation layers have been dated to circa 2,200 BC. Among the findings are also a number of clay tablets, containing small cuneiform signs; each clay retaining a rectangular form and extending about four inches on the sides. This suggests the Lullubi, just like other advanced civilizations of ancient Mesopotamia, were well versed with literacy needed for trading.Related Video: Drone captures amazing abandoned mountain top villageCNRS cuneiform specialist Philippe Clancier said in a statement that the scribes who created the tablets “had a firm grasp of Akkadian and Sumerian writing, as well as that of their Mesopotamian neighbors.” Some of the tablets were found to provide information about large repositories which would have supported the city’s extensive agricultural activities. An irrigation system was also in place to aid the growth of crops.An Akkadian inscriptionMore than that, the tablets used a so far unregistered unit of measurement, different from the Mesopotamian gur. The Lullubi rather used a unit of their own to detail trading, a strong indication they functioned independently. The mighty Akkadians overshadowed the Lullubi, however. But as the leading archaeologist on the team, Aline Tenu, said in a statement, “the city of Kunara provides new elements regarding a hitherto unknown people that has remained at the periphery of Mesopotamian studies.”Akkadian Empire soldiers on the Victory Stele of Naram-Sin, circa 2250 BC. Photo by Rama CC BY-SA 2.0 frThe excavations of the Kunara site are widening the perspectives. The occupants of the lost city likely maintained strong economic relationships with regions remote to them — to the north toward Anatolia and beyond to the Caucasus region, and to the east where the ancient Iranians extended.A variety of artifacts such as stone tools carved from obsidian, carnelian, and basalt suggest the possibility the city indeed connected to those far-flung territories.“The city must have even been fairly prosperous, as rare stones such as obsidian were used to produce entirely commonplace tools,” said Tenu.Caucasus. Photo by Bourrichon CC BY-SA 4.0That the city belonged to an advanced society is evidenced by bones belonging to different animals including lions and bears. Animals of this type were especially prized at the time, and their remnants found around Kunara may be proof of lavish offerings and royal hunting practices. The remains of goats, sheep, and other livestock additionally implicate a developed farming system.Further analysis of the artifacts collected in the field will hopefully offer more insight about this intriguing and seemingly wealthy city, as well as the political relations it had with the vast empire it neighbored.Read another story from us: Secret Egyptian Palace of Ramesses II Discovered by AccidentMore excavations are set to continue in the area, which until relatively recently has remained closed to scientific research due to the persistent tensions and conflicts in the Middle East.last_img read more

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Sri Lanka suspects international terror link to Easter Sunday bombings

first_imgShareTweetSharePinThe Sri Lankan government has admitted it failed to act on multiple warnings before a coordinated series of attacks ripped through churches and hotels on Easter Sunday, and said it feared an international terror group might have been behind the atrocities, CNN has reported.According to the CNN report, a government spokesman, Rajitha Senaratne, said multiple warnings were received in the days before the attacks, which killed 290 people and injured at least 500 more.“CNN understands that at least one warning referred to Nations Thawahid Jaman (NTJ), a little-known local Islamist group which has previously defaced Buddhist statues,” the report stated.It said Senaratne, who is also health minister, said he did not believe a local group could have acted alone.“There must be a wider international network behind it,” the CNN report quoted him as saying.There were also fears of more devices following the attack. Police found 87 detonators in a private terminal of the main bus station in Sri Lanka’s capital, Colombo, on Monday. A ninth improvised explosive device (IED) was defused near the capital’s Bandaranaike International Airport on Sunday evening.Read more…last_img read more

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Preparations begin for twincity deal between Rajkot and Chinas Jiaozhou

first_img Dragon-elephant tango “Rajkot figures among the developing cities of India and it is proposed to sign a strategic agreement with Jiaozhou city in Quingdao state of India’s neighbouring country China for cooperation in areas of mutual interests… like service delivery, citizens, administration, land use planning and management, transport, housing, education, culture, sports and games, management of solid waste and waste-water, physical infrastructure, environment, public health, science and technology, tourism, managing historical places, city rejuvenation, city and regional planning and allied matters…” stated the proposal.To operationalise the agreement, the proposal sought setting up of an authority comprising civic officers and elected leaders of the RMC.The agreement will be of non-biding nature but can include clauses on making financial provisions for executing projects. The agreement, the proposal said, will facilitate exchange of know-how and best practices.“The agreement will be valid for a period of three years or until the time either of the party gives a three-month notice to end the agreement. However, termination of agreement will have no bearing on any project under the agreement,” stated the proposal moved by the municipal commissioner. At its weekly meeting, the standing committee cleared the proposal moved by the office of Rajkot Municipal Commissioner, Banchhanidhi Pani, urging it to get the nod of RMC general board to appoint the municipal commissioner as the main coordinator for signing the proposed twin-city agreement between Rakot and Jiaozhou.The proposal also sought to get a green signal from the general board to authorise Rajkot mayor, chairman of the standing committee and the municipal commissioner to sign the agreement with Jiaozhou, a city in eastern China’s Shandong province.The municipal commissioner based his proposal on a letter sent by joint secretary of urban development and urban housing department of the state government to the RMC in January this year, directing the civic body to start making preparations for signing the agreement. Best Of Express Municipal commissioner Pani said there were some similarities between Jiajhaou and Rajkot, which was the reason behind the proposal.“Other cities like Ahmedabad already have similar agreements with other cities. There are similarities between Rajkot and the Chinese city in terms of size, presence of small and medium scale industries, nature of the city, etc. Both are comparable cities and can learn from exchange programmes, workshops and best practices,” said Pani. He said there was no deadline to complete the formality of signing the agreement.The general board is the highest decision-making body of the Rajkot Municipal Corporation. The ruling BJP enjoys majority in the 72-member board which meets usually every three months. Its latest meeting was held in June. Advertising China gears up for next summit meeting with India, appeals to shed opposition to CPEC Related News Ayodhya dispute: Mediation to continue till July 31, SC hearing likely from August 2 center_img india china, rmc china twin city agreement, rajkot jiaozhou twin city agreement, gujarat china twin city agreement, jiaozhou, gujarat news Municipal commissioner Pani said there were some similarities between Jiajhaou and Rajkot, which was the reason behind the proposal.Signalling the groundwork for a twin-city agreement with the Chinese city of Jiaozhou, the standing committee of Rajkot Municipal Corporation on Monday cleared a proposal to set up a panel for the same. India proposes reply to Wuhan: An informal summit with China in Varanasi this October By Express News Service |Rajkot | Published: July 3, 2019 7:31:16 am LiveKarnataka floor test: MLAs have made false allegations in SC, says CM Chandrayaan-2 launch on July 22 at 2.43 pm: ISRO Advertising Post Comment(s)last_img read more

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Historians expose early scientists debt to the slave trade

first_img Gold Coast Email Windward Coast Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe 1 NHM IMAGES France There’s a tendency to think about the history of science in this—I don’t want to say triumphant, but—progressive way, that it’s always a force for good. We tend to forget the ways in which that isn’t the case. Spain Trade routes When people were traded like goods In the “triangular trade” of the 16th through 19th centuries, millions of people were shipped to the Americas as slaves, raw materials were transported to Europe, and manufactured goods went to Africa. The three-way trade provided European collectors access to specimens from Africa and the Americas. Britain Portugal (MAP) AFRICAN SLAVE TRADE, 1500–1870/PEARSON EDUCATION, INC., ADAPTED BY N. DESAI/SCIENCE; (DATA) TRANS-ATLANTIC SLAVE TRADE DATABASE/EMORY CENTER FOR DIGITAL SCHOLARSHIP EUROPE Bight of Biafra West central Africa Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Africans shipped to America Colonizing nations Historians expose early scientists’ debt to the slave trade 2 When British slave ships arrived in Latin America, the crews had strict orders to stay at port and not poke around, mostly because Spain wanted to protect its monopoly on certain lucrative natural resources. But naturalists such as Petiver knew Spain had no way to enforce that rule—the territories had too little oversight. So they cultivated crew members to collect specimens on the sly.Murphy’s research shows Petiver employed mostly ship surgeons, who cared for slaves on the voyage across the ocean. The surgeons were scientifically educated, she says, and had plenty of free time at ports such as Cartagena, in modern Colombia, and Portobelo, in modern Panama, while their fellow crew members sold slaves and provisioned the ships. Petiver usually supplied recruits with kits that included jars for insects and brown paper for pressing plants. Compensation included books, medicines, and cash.Strikingly, some naturalists also instructed their contacts abroad to train slaves as collectors. Slaves often knew about specimens that Europeans didn’t and visited areas that Europeans wouldn’t. Those slaves virtually never got credit for their work, though Petiver did offer to pay them a half-crown ($18 today) for every dozen insects or 12 pence ($7) for every dozen plants.Petiver never collected overseas himself, but some scientists did, and they often found themselves in morally compromising positions. Henry Smeathman, an idealistic English naturalist, sailed for a slave colony in Sierra Leone in December 1771 and collected for the likes of Joseph Banks, an adviser to King George and longtime president of the Royal Society. Among other activities, Smeathman studied the massive termite mounds in western Africa, which stand up to 4 meters high. He had rollicking adventures breaking the mounds open and fending off attacks from angry, biting termite soldiers. Senegambia Southeast Africa SOUTH AMERICA NORTH AMERICA Those connections aren’t just ancient history. Thousands of specimens collected through the slave trade still reside in places such as the Natural History Museum in London, and they’re still used in genetic and taxonomic research. Yet few people using the collections know of their origins.All of which casts an uncomfortable shadow on what’s often viewed as a heroic era in science. “We do not often think of the wretched, miserable, and inhuman spaces of slave ships as simultaneously being spaces of natural history,” Murphy writes in The William and Mary Quarterly. “Yet Petiver’s museum suggests that this is exactly what they were.”Compromises to gain access to distant landsSlavery is as old as civilization, but the transatlantic slave trade between the 1500s and 1800s was particularly brutal. Estimates vary, but at least 10 million Africans were enslaved, with roughly half dying on the way to slave ports or on voyages across the ocean. Statistics alone can’t capture the cruelty and squalor of slave ships, though. Men and women were chained up for weeks in hot, filthy holds, where diseases ran rampant and punishment for disobedience was harsh. Sharks reportedly followed ships on journeys, having learned that a slave or two would probably be tossed overboard—or commit suicide—at some point.Why did scientists align themselves with that horror? Access. European governments did sometimes sponsor scientific expeditions, but most ships visiting Africa and the Americas were private vessels engaged in the “triangular trade.” That three-way exchange sent guns and manufactured goods to Africa; slaves to the Americas; and dyes, drugs, and sugar back to Europe. To gain access to Africa and the Americas, scientists had to hitch rides on slave ships. Upon arrival, the naturalists also relied on slavers for food, shelter, mail, equipment, and local transport.France, Portugal, and the Netherlands captured and sold slaves, Murphy notes. But most historians studying science and slavery focus on Great Britain, which in the 1700s boasted the world’s biggest and most powerful fleets, had adventurous scientists and collectors, and was a major participant in the slave trade. Spain controlled most of South and Central America then, but it lacked colonies in Africa and therefore couldn’t import slaves directly. So it contracted that job out to various groups, including the British in the early 1700s, buying up to 4800 Africans per year. At the dawn of the 1700s, European science seemed poised to conquer all of nature. Isaac Newton had recently published his monumental theory of gravity. Telescopes were opening up the heavens to study, and Robert Hooke and Antonie van Leeuwenhoek’s microscopes were doing the same for the miniature world. Fantastic new plants and animals were pouring in from Asia and the Americas. But one of the most important scientists alive then was someone few people have ever heard of, an apothecary and naturalist named James Petiver. And he was important for a startling reason: He had good connections within the slave trade.Although he rarely left London, Petiver ran a global network of dozens of ship surgeons and captains who collected animal and plant specimens for him in far-flung colonies. Petiver set up a museum and research center with those specimens, and he and visiting scientists wrote papers that other naturalists (including Carl Linnaeus, the father of taxonomy) drew on. Between one-quarter and one-third of Petiver’s collectors worked in the slave trade, largely because he had no other options: Few ships outside the slave trade traveled to key points in Africa and Latin America. Petiver eventually amassed the largest natural history collection in the world, and it never would have happened without slavery.Petiver wasn’t unique. By examining scientific papers, correspondence between naturalists, and the records of slaving companies, historians are now seeing new connections between science and slavery and piecing together just how deeply intertwined they were. “The biggest surprise is, for a topic that has been ignored for so long, how much there was once I started digging,” says Kathleen Murphy, a science historian at California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo who’s writing a book about the topic. She adds, “There’s a tendency to think about the history of science in this—I don’t want to say triumphant, but—progressive way, that it’s always a force for good. We tend to forget the ways in which that isn’t the case.” James Delbourgo, Rutgers University Sugar, molasses Milllion As detailed in the 2018 book Henry Smeathman, the Flycatcher: Natural History, Slavery, and Empire in the Late Eighteenth Century, by historian Deirdre Coleman of the University of Melbourne in Australia, Smeathman began his journey as a foe of slavery, vowing to tell the truth about “those little-known and much misrepresented people, the Negroes.” And as a scientist, he considered himself superior to the ignorant, crude slavers he encountered in Sierra Leone. (For their part, the slavers thought him barmy for coming all the way to Africa to hunt for bugs and weeds.)But Smeathman was utterly dependent on those men for food, protection, and transportation. He also got lonely and started to socialize with them, playing whist and backgammon and even golf on a rugged, two-hole course on an offshore island. Soon he was hunting goats and enjoying grog-soaked feasts on the beach with the slavers. By 1774, he was working for a slaving company based in Liverpool because it greased the wheels for shipping specimens; he even started to trade slaves in exchange for supplies for his expeditions. Bit by bit, compromise by compromise, Smeathman became part of the system he once despised.Smeathman and others also relied on slavers to haul their precious specimens to Great Britain, packing them onto the same ships as enslaved Africans. (Few ships sailed straight back to Europe from Africa, so most specimens reached England via the Caribbean.) Perhaps not surprisingly, given how they treated their human cargo, the ships’ crews had a spotty record in caring for fragile bugs, plants, and animal skins. If the sunlight, heat, humidity, and saltwater didn’t destroy the specimens, the worms, ants, and rodents onboard usually did. Careless sailors might also smash the specimens by accident or for sport.Of the items that arrived safely in England, naturalists were most excited about exotic finds such as ostrich eggs, Goliath beetles, butterflies, sloths, and armadillos. But the real treasures, Murphy writes, were drugs such as cinchona bark, which contains quinine, and dyes such as deep-blue indigo and bright-red cochineal. The latter, which is extracted from beetles, was worth more per ounce than silver.Scientific studies of drugs and dyes often opened new opportunities for slave traders. Merchants eagerly sought natural resources to exploit abroad and consulted scientists about the best way to hunt for and cultivate them. Quinine and other drugs gleaned from tropical locales, Murphy notes, also helped Europeans survive there. And the safer and more profitable a colony was, the more its commercial activity, including slavery, thrived, creating new demand for slaves. Scientific research, then, not only depended on colonial slavery, but enabled it and helped expand its reach.The tainted origins of many cabinets of curiosityOf all the scientific fields, natural history benefited most from the slave trade, especially botany and entomology. One disciple of Linnaeus reported collecting three species new to science within 15 minutes on his first excursion in Sierra Leone. The bounty of plants astounded him.Doctors affiliated with slavery also collected human remains. “The trade in natural curiosities was widespread, and body parts were definitely part of that,” says Carolyn Roberts, a historian of science and assistant professor of African American studies at Yale University who’s writing a book about the slave trade and medicine. “Doctors would send things to Britain, especially if they had a case they found interesting.” Examples of interesting items included polyps cut from the hands of slaves, patches of dried skin, a fetus taken after a miscarriage, and, according to one old catalog, “stones extracted from the vagina of a negro African girle.”Those bugs and plants and bits of human beings often ended up in wealthy gentlemen’s “cabinets of curiosity,” jammed next to Roman coins and gems and whatever else tickled their fancy. Other specimens landed in universities or scholarly institutes. Kathleen Murphy, California Polytechnic State University Tobacco, rice, cotton CARIBBEAN ISLANDS James Delbourgo, a historian at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey, who has written extensively about slavery and science, agrees. He argues that the belief in the progressive nature of science has made historians reluctant to take a critical look at its past. “This is a hard story for us to deal with,” he says. He adds that academic specialization also prevented many people from seeing what, in retrospect, seem like obvious connections: “Slave trade historians don’t know about science, and vice versa.” 3 Sierra Leone AFRICA In addition to his own collecting, Hans Sloane (pictured) bought up the collections of other naturalists, many of whom used slave ships to reach far-flung places. When Sloane died in 1753, his specimens became the founding collection of the British Museum. They later ended up in London’s Natural History Museum. European scientists in South America often relied on black or native people to collect for them. In an illustration from 1806, three Africans in Suriname kill and flay a gigantic snake while a European scientist stands back and directs. The Netherlands By Sam KeanApr. 4, 2019 , 10:00 AM Some historians now refer to those private and institutional collections as the “big science” of their day. Scholars studied those centralized repositories and then circulated accounts of their research to other scientists. Linnaeus drew on such accounts when putting together Systema Naturae in 1735, the book that introduced his famous binomial naming system for flora and fauna.A few physical sciences also piggybacked on the slave trade. Slave labor built the first major observatory in the Southern Hemisphere, in Cape Town, South Africa. Astronomers such as Edmond Halley solicited observations of the moon and stars from slave ports, and geologists collected rocks and minerals there.Even a field as rarefied as celestial mechanics benefited from slavery. When developing his theory of gravity, Newton studied ocean tides, knowing that the gravitational tug of the moon causes them. Newton needed tide readings from all over the globe, and one crucial set of readings came from French slave ports in Martinique. Delbourgo says, “Newton himself, who’s really the paradigm figure of an isolated, nontraveling, sitting-at-his-desk genius, had access to numbers he wouldn’t have had access to without the Atlantic slave trade.”Museums grapple with the pastMany natural history specimens with ties to the slave trade eventually ended up in museums. When Petiver died in 1718, a fellow naturalist in London named Hans Sloane snapped up his collection. Sloane had collected on slave plantations in Jamaica, and he married into a slaving family whose money enabled more collecting. In 1727, he succeeded Newton as president of the Royal Society (which itself invested in slaving companies).When Sloane died in 1753, he willed his collection, including Petiver’s goods, to the British government, and it became the foundation of the British Museum in London. The museum later split into several entities. Many of Sloane’s specimens went to the Natural History Museum, where they remain today. Specimens collected through the slave trade also ended up at the Oxford University Herbaria, Royal Society, and Chelsea Physic Garden, among other places, Murphy reports.Representatives for those institutes say it’s difficult to put numbers on how many of their specimens have ties to slavery. In some cases, they haven’t gone through and digitized the records yet, and many old specimens have vague or fragmentary records anyway, making their provenance obscure. But documents from the 18th and 19th centuries attest to thousands upon thousands of items pouring into Europe. Smeathman alone sent 600 species of plants and 710 species of insects back to England, often with several individuals per species. (One of Smeathman’s patrons complained about the glut of bugs, writing that Smeathman had sent too many to unpack: “My House could not possibly contain one half.”) And although many old specimens have either disintegrated or been lost, at least some with ties to slavery probably survive in almost every institute in Europe with natural history collections dating back a few centuries. Bight of Benin Newton himself, who’s really the paradigm figure of an isolated, nontraveling, sitting-at-his-desk genius, had access to numbers he wouldn’t have had access to without the Atlantic slave trade. Guns, textiles THE JOHN CARTER BROWN LIBRARY AT BROWN UNIVERSITY Those collections aren’t just antiquarian curiosities. Scientists still consult them to construct phylogenies and do taxonomic work: Many of the collections contain type specimens, the first described individual of a species against which all other individuals are compared. The collections are also invaluable for studying plant domestication, historic climate change, and shifts in geographical distributions of species. Scientists have even extracted DNA from specimens to study how plants and animals have evolved across the centuries.Most scientists, however, remain unaware of the origins of the collections. “Very few people think about how [specimens] were collected, whether they were collected through slave trade routes or otherwise,” says Stephen Harris, a curator at the Oxford University Herbaria, which houses some of Sloane’s goods. “They’re simply data points.”In an email, Mark Carine, a curator at the Natural History Museum, noted that institutions such as his have a broader role than just preserving specimens. “As curators, we have a responsibility not only to care for our collections and make them available for research but also to facilitate an understanding of their significance and relevance today.” He adds that Sloane’s collection “is not simply a biological record; it is also a resource for understanding the social and historical context within which science developed, and we are certainly keen to continue working with researchers across disciplines to better understand this.”Still, Murphy and Delbourgo say that even some curators are oblivious to the histories of their collections, and Murphy encountered one who dismissed her work outright. Delbourgo emphasizes that his historical research “isn’t an attack on museums” and that he knows museum staff are often “under-resourced and overworked.” But, he adds, “Museums have been bad” about acknowledging the dubious origins of many items. “They have dragged their feet enormously.”Now that the link between early science and slavery has come to light, an important question remains: What should scientists do about it?Historians say acknowledgment is a start: In research papers, scientists should mention how specimens were gathered. Taking the origin of specimens into account can also improve the research itself, especially given the paucity of collecting records in some cases. For example, Murphy mentions that the slave trade can help explain the geographic distributions of certain specimens. African plants, for instance, wouldn’t have been collected from all over the continent, but from specific points along the coast—the ports where countries were shipping slaves.”From a scientific point of view, your specimen is essentially a piece of evidence,” Harris adds, “and the more you know about the provenance of that piece of evidence and the better understanding you have … the better you can use it within your analyses.”The connections between science and the slave trade could also feed into ongoing debates about reparations and the historical legacies of slavery. Like some U.K. organizations, U.S. universities such as Yale, Georgetown, and Brown have acknowledged how they benefited from slavery. For the most part, Murphy says, those conversations are framed “in terms of just dollars and cents, pounds and pence. Yet [the profits] can also clearly be measured in specimens collected and papers published.”Overall, she says, “Modern science and the transatlantic slave trade were two of the most important factors in the shaping of the modern world.” Historians are finally recognizing that they shaped each other as well. As Delbourgo says, “We’ve been so negligent in bringing these histories [of slavery and science] together. We’ve missed that they are in fact the same history.”last_img read more

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Swine fever toll in China may be twice as high as reported

first_img Taking stock of monsoon rain By Reuters |Beijing | Updated: June 30, 2019 9:39:29 am Post Comment(s) Cabinet asks finance panel to consider securing funds for defence Advertising China GDP growth slows to 6.2% in second quarter After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan Advertising Advertising The vast and fragmented nature of China’s agricultural sector, a secretive bureaucracy and what is widely believed among industry experts to be poor Chinese data quality, makes the full extent of the disease impossible to ascertain.“Almost all the pigs here have died,” said a farmer in Bobai county in China’s southwestern Guangxi region. Guangxi produced more than 33 million pigs in 2017, and is a key supplier to southern China.“We were not allowed to report the pig disease,” she told Reuters, declining to reveal her name because of the sensitivity of the issue, adding that authorities have detained farmers for “spreading rumours” about the disease. Reuters was unable to verify this.Authorities in Yulin city, which oversees Bobai county, confirmed an outbreak of the disease in one pig on May 27. It was only the second to be reported in the region after a case in the city of Beihai on Feb. 19.The agriculture and rural affairs bureau of Guangxi region did not respond to a fax seeking comment.Reuters also spoke to farmers in the cities of Zhongshan, Foshan and Maoming in neighbouring Guangdong province, all of whom had lost hundreds or thousands of pigs to the disease in the last three months. No outbreaks have been officially reported in those cities. None of the farmers agreed to be identified.The agriculture bureaus of Guangdong and Hunan provinces did not respond to faxes seeking comment.Like ‘an oil slick’China had 375 million pigs at the end of March, 10% fewer than at the same time a year ago, according to the National Bureau of Statistics (NBS). It had 38 million sows, a decline of 11% on the year, the NBS said.Numerous suppliers to the industry have said they believe the actual decline is much worse.Dick Hordijk, chief executive at Dutch co-operative Royal Agrifirm, told Dutch radio station BNR last month that his firm’s profits in China would be wiped out by the disease, which was spreading like “an oil slick”.“One hundred percent of our business was focussed on pigs, half of it is now gone,” he said. “That’s a disaster for the farmers and the animals.”The company produces premixes, or blends of vitamins and other nutrients, in two factories in China, and sells them to around 100 large pig farmers in China for use in feed.Stephan Lange, vice president for animal health in China at privately owned pharmaceutical firm Boehringer Ingelheim, which makes vaccines, and Johnson, the Beijing-based veterinarian, said losses had been higher than 50% in pockets of the country.Major livestock producing provinces including Hebei, Henan and Shandong are believed by some in the industry to have been especially hard-hit.Big producers, empty farmsIn Shandong, the fourth largest pig-raising province in China, more than half of farms with large numbers of sows were now empty, Johnson estimated, based on his conversations with farmers and larger pig producers.The virus is so widespread that he has detected it on the surface of a highway in the province, where it can be spread by passing trucks, he added. He used the same test that is widely used to detect the virus in pigs.Shandong’s agriculture bureau did not respond to a fax seeking comment on the issue. Authorities there previously said the sow herd shrank by 41 percent in the seven months to February 2019, even after only reporting one outbreak.Henan said in a statement to Reuters it has only had two outbreaks of the disease. Its sow herd fell 16.5% in the first quarter, due to various factors including market prices and African swine fever, it said, without giving further details.In Hebei too, the northern province surrounding Beijing, many counties have few sows left, said Johnson, who saw his first case of the disease there in October.Hebei has only reported one outbreak – in February this year – but an agriculture ministry survey published online said the sow herd fell by 32% in the first quarter.Hebei province told Reuters in a statement the African swine fever situation was “stable” and disputed the assertion that there were few sows left in many counties.‘I dare not raise pigs’Beijing has repeatedly called for farmers to restock, but putting new sows on to a farm that has been infected with African swine fever is risky, say experts.The virus can survive for weeks outside a host, potentially living on in a farm that has not been thoroughly disinfected.Lange said a few of his customers have started restocking empty farms, but for some the disease returned.“There’s still a lot of insecurity obviously. If you get reinfected again, that’s really a lot of money you’re losing,” he said.The Bobai farmer, who now has no way of paying off her debts, said she has no intention of restarting her farm, even if she could afford to. Best Of Express Prosperous China says ‘men preferred’ and women lose “I dare not raise pigs,” she said. “You can’t see the virus with your eyes. The virus is still here, there is virus in the pigsty.” swine flu, swine flu in china, china swine flu, swine flu outbreak in china, china swine flu outbreak, world news Losses are not only from infected pigs dying or being culled, but also farmers sending pigs to market early when the disease is discovered nearby. (File)As many as half of China’s breeding pigs have either died from African swine fever or been slaughtered because of the spreading disease, twice as many as officially acknowledged, according to the estimates of four people who supply large farms. More Explained Related News Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield Trump says ‘will take a look’ at accusations over Google, China The Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs did not respond to a fax seeking comment on claims of much higher losses than officially reported. It said on June 24 the disease has been “effectively controlled”, state news agency Xinhua reported.Dutch agricultural lender Rabobank said in April that pork production losses from China’s African swine fever outbreak could reach 35%. It is revising that number higher to account for widespread slaughtering in recent months, Pan Chenjun, senior analyst, told Reuters.Unreported outbreaksAfrican swine fever, for which there is no cure and no vaccine, kills almost all infected pigs, though it does not harm people. Since China’s first reported case last August – the virus is similar to the strain found in recent years in Russia, Georgia and Estonia – it has spread to every province and beyond China’s borders, despite measures taken by Beijing to curb its advance.The government has reported 137 outbreaks so far, but many more are going unreported, most recently in southern provinces such as Guangdong, Guangxi and Hunan, according to four farmers and an official recently interviewed by Reuters. While other estimates are more conservative, the plunge in the number of sows is poised to leave a large hole in the supply of the country’s favourite meat, pushing up food prices and devastating livelihoods in a rural economy that includes 40 million pig farmers.“Something like 50% of sows are dead,” said Edgar Wayne Johnson, a veterinarian who has spent 14 years in China and founded Enable Agricultural Technology Consulting, a Beijing-based farm services firm with clients across the country.Three other executives at producers of vaccines, feed additives and genetics also estimate losses of 40% to 50%, based on falling sales for their companies’ products and direct knowledge of the extent of the deadly disease on farms across the country. Losses are not only from infected pigs dying or being culled, but also farmers sending pigs to market early when the disease is discovered nearby, farmers and industry insiders have told Reuters, which analysts say has kept a lid on pork prices in recent months.However, prices began rising substantially this month and China’s agricultural ministry has said they could surge by 70 percent in coming months as a result of the outbreak. Pork accounts for more than 60% of Chinese meat consumption.China, which produces half the world’s pork, said this month its sow herd declined by a record 23.9% in May from a year earlier, a slightly deeper drop than for the overall pig herd.Sows, or adult females bred to produce piglets for slaughter, account for roughly one in 10 pigs in China. A decline in the sow herd usually equates to a similar drop in pork output, industry experts say.last_img read more

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Increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistance in the US linked with occasional use

Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Dec 18 2018Researchers found that widespread, low-intensity use of antibiotics may play more of a role in antibiotic resistance than high-intensity, repeated use by a small fraction of the populationThe increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistance in the U.S. appears more closely linked with their occasional use by many people than by their repeated use among smaller numbers of people, according to a large new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.The study also found that antibiotic use varies across the nation, and that in areas where particular antibiotics are used more frequently, resistance to those antibiotics is higher.”We know that efforts to reduce inappropriate use of antibiotics are critical to addressing the problem of antibiotic resistance. We wondered whether every antibiotic prescription contributes equally to resistance, and whether, as some previous research has suggested, the most effective way to minimize antibiotic resistance would be to focus on the small fraction of people who use most of the antibiotics,” said Yonatan Grad, Melvin J. and Geraldine L. Glimcher Assistant Professor of Immunology and Infectious Diseases and senior author of the study. “Our results show that most antibiotic use is occasional–by people taking just one antibiotic course in a year–and that this occasional use is more closely linked with antibiotic resistance than intense, repeated use.”The study was published online December 18, 2018 in eLife. It is the first to take a population-wide look at the link between distribution of antibiotic use and resistance to those antibiotics.Antibiotic resistance has risen to dangerously high levels in recent years, spurred by over-prescription and overuse. Infections such as gonorrhea, tuberculosis, and foodborne diseases are becoming harder, and sometimes impossible, to treat as antibiotics become less effective, according to the World Health Organization (WHO).In the new study, researchers sought to home in on how the distribution of antibiotic use impacts antibiotic resistance. They used data sources that allowed them to simultaneously analyze antibiotic use and resistance for an unprecedented number of antibiotics and pathogens. They used two nationwide pharmacy prescription claims databases, Truven Health MarketScan Research Database and Medicare, to determine antibiotic use among 60 million Americans–roughly 20% of the U.S. population–from 2011 to 2014. They then compared that data with information from 2012 to 2015 from ResistanceOpen, which tracks antibiotic resistance across the U.S. To determine if rates of antibiotic use for a particular drug correlate with rates of antibiotic resistance against that drug, the researchers looked at 72 pairs of antibiotics and bacteria across the U.S.Related StoriesAMSBIO offers new, best-in-class CAR-T cell range for research and immunotherapySchwann cells capable of generating protective myelin over nerves finds researchInterdisciplinary approach reduces the use of broad spectrum antibioticsThe study showed that, in 2011, 34% of people received antibiotics, that 10% of the population used 57% of the antibiotics, and that this distribution was similar for each year of the study. The researchers found that the more a particular antibiotic was used, the greater the resistance. For instance, in U.S. states that use more quinolones, more E. coli-caused infections tend to be resistant to quinolones.However, when breaking down total use of antibiotic into occasional, low-intensity use by many people versus intense use by a few people, they found that the occasional, low-intensity use was more closely associated with rates of resistance.”Our findings suggest that combatting inappropriate antibiotic use among people who don’t take many antibiotics may be just as important, or more important, to fighting resistance than focusing on high-intensity users,” said lead author Scott Olesen, postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases. “More antibiotic use generally means more antibiotic resistance, but it seems like the number of people taking antibiotics might matter more than the amount they’re taking.”Source: https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/ read more

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NIH awards 23 million grant to study the diseases affecting people with

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Jun 8 2019The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has awarded a seven-year, $23 million grant to researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Health System to study HIV and the chronic illnesses that often accompany HIV infection, including cardiovascular and lung disease, diabetes, and cancer.The new grant builds on previous scientific and clinical research from the 26-year-old Women’s Interagency HIV Study (WIHS), a multi-center study of women who are either living with HIV or at risk for HIV infection. The NIH has merged the WIHS study with a comparable parallel study in men known as the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study, or MACS, which began in 1984. Together, those studies enrolled thousands of participants and spurred more than 2,300 publications on HIV-related topics.The new study, called the MACS/WIHS Combined Cohort Study, will continue using information from participants in the earlier studies and will enroll an additional 2,500 men and women, including people without HIV. It also will focus on the chronic conditions that now affect people living with HIV, rather than the HIV infection itself.New research targets This change in emphasis makes our research much broader and more focused on the leading causes of illness and death among people living with HIV. People are living longer with HIV because of the miraculous success of antiretroviral treatment. As a result, the immune complications of HIV rarely kill people now – rather, it’s the advance of those other diseases, which often occur much earlier than expected in people living with HIV.”Co-principal investigator Kathryn Anastos, M.D., professor of medicine, of epidemiology & population health, and of obstetrics & gynecology and women’s health at Einstein and a general internist at Montefiore Related StoriesHIV therapy leaves unrepaired holes in the immune system’s wall of defenseReprogramming cells to control HIV infectionPrevalence of anal cancer precursors is higher in women living with HIV than previously reportedDr. Anastos has led scientific and clinical research at the Einstein and Montefiore Bronx WIHS site, one of nine in the nation, since 1993. Anjali Sharma, M.D., M.S., co-principal investigator, associate professor of medicine at Einstein, and an internist and infectious disease physician at Montefiore, joined the Bronx WIHS in 2013.”We’ve been among the leading investigators into several specific areas, including cardiovascular disease, human papillomavirus (HPV), female genital tract immunology, and emerging studies of the microbiome,” said Dr. Anastos, who also is co-director emeritus of Einstein’s Global Health Center and director of the clinical, translational, and implementation science core of the Einstein-Rockefeller-CUNY Center for AIDS Research.Tracking aging and social impacts on healthThe new study will allow researchers to investigate the impact of age, race, ethnicity, and health disparities on HIV-related comorbidities and HIV disease progression. The Bronx site will enroll between 150 and 200 participants.”Enrolling both men and women will help us look into how HIV and chronic illnesses affect the genders differently, particularly as people age,” said Dr. Sharma. “That knowledge can inform our understanding of gender differences in health and disease across the lifespan far beyond HIV.”Study participants will undergo comprehensive annual exams and tests. Researchers also will study disease-related outcomes such as heart attacks and strokes, conduct neuropsychiatric testing to assess cognition, and administer detailed psychiatric evaluations.Source: Albert Einstein College of Medicinelast_img read more

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Tech faithful gather to worship at mecca of innovation

After a rollercoaster year for the tech world, many industry leaders are looking to the cutting edge for salvation. Race for ‘smart’ hits fever pitch at electronics show “Most people in tech are optimistic, but they may be naively optimistic.”Digital doctoringRobin Raskin, who heads the CES segment called Living in Digital Times, pointed to advances in health and medicine in recent years, particularly new technologies to assess cancer and treatment possibilities.Startups and major firms are also using new apps and technologies to tackle diabetes and depression.One startup on Sunday unveiled eye-tracking technology to analyze ailments including autism, concussions and Parkinson’s disease.RightEye co-founder and chief executive Adam Gross heralded the technology as “a game-changer” for the health care and sports industries, emphasizing the ability to quickly and accurately generate “amazing insights” into health, vision and performance.In collaboration with doctors or trainers, the information could be used to guide therapies or exercise routines.”The potential for this technology to change people’s lives around the world is incredible and really exciting,” Gross said.Technology will automate and augment the treatment of disease in the years ahead, predicted Consumer Technology Association research manager Lesley Rohrbaugh.”You can talk with a health care provider through an app, and get remote monitoring,” Rohrbaugh said, speaking at CES.”You can visit your doctor without actually physically visiting them.”Virtual reality is also being incorporated into therapy, used to treat traumas, phobias and even dementia from aging, according to Rohrbaugh.Cities smarten upAs much of the global population migrates to urban areas, technology is powering “smart cities”—where sensors, cameras and cloud computing work like house elves to manage needs like recycling, trash disposal, traffic, pollution and road repairs.Inside homes, devices can make sure water and air stay clean, and that people are sleeping well.Technology can also keep us safe, exhibitors say. Biometrics including fingerprint, iris and facial recognition are being built into smartphones, computers and padlocks as security features.Robots, meanwhile, are being designed to do everything from patrol oceans for fish poachers to watching after us, especially as we age. © 2018 AFP As tech industry players converge in Las Vegas for the 2018 Consumer Electronics Show, an overriding theme is that gizmos, artificial intelligence, cloud computing and superfast internet connections hold answers to many if not all ills—the new religion.One of the world’s largest trade shows, CES is drawing an expected 170,000 people and 40,000 exhibitors from dozens of countries showing wares in robotics, digital health, artificial intelligence, sports and more.Technology will continue to improve communication, enchanting us with bolder and brighter screens, exhibitors say—but it additionally vows to end urban congestion, treat cancer and depression, and help us live fitter and more productive lives.Jensen Huang, chief executive of the computer chip and artificial intelligence group Nvidia, said advances in machine learning have opened up vast possibilities, including the ability of software writing software.”This means we can solve previously unsolvable problems,” Huang told a media event Sunday, ahead of the official Tuesday opening of the trade event.Some exhibitors envision a world where self-driving cars could be summoned any time of the day, eliminating struggles to find parking or petrol stations.Machines would tend to the tedium of traffic, which would run smoother since vehicles would wirelessly “talk” to one another to optimize travel efficiency.A new “intuitive and intelligent” car from Chinese startup Byton aims to tackle the billions of hours lost to traffic congestion around the world each year. Those times lost “could be used for things which are so much more fulfilling,” Henrik Wenders, vice president of Byton, said Sunday at one of the first media events at the show.While tech is being touted as a solution to many ills, there is also a darker side, noted analyst Bob O’Donnell of Technalysis Research.”Tech is being seen as the cure for everything, but it can also be the cause of societal issues,” O’Donnell said, citing concerns over cybersecurity and a recently revealed flaw in computer chip technology that could leak data. Explore further Citation: Tech faithful gather to worship at mecca of innovation (2018, January 8) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-01-tech-faithful-worship-mecca.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. read more

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